Health

Can ‘The Science’ Learn From Our Experience With Antibiotics And Bacteria?

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Research confirms the dangers of bacteria developing the ability to resist drugs. Does the same thing apply to leaky mRNA vaccines?

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses a major threat to human health around the world. Previous publications have estimated the effect of AMR on incidence, deaths, hospital length of stay, and health-care costs for specific pathogen–drug combinations in select locations. To our knowledge, this study presents the most comprehensive estimates of AMR burden to date.

The study published in the Lancet medical journal calculated that 1.27m deaths in 2019 were the direct result of drug resistant bacterial infections and 4.95m deaths were associated with them.

To our knowledge, this study provides the first comprehensive assessment of the global burden of AMR, as well as an evaluation of the availability of data. AMR is a leading cause of death around the world, with the highest burdens in low-resource settings. Understanding the burden of AMR and the leading pathogen–drug combinations contributing to it is crucial to making informed and location-specific policy decisions, particularly about infection prevention and control programmes, access to essential antibiotics, and research and development of new vaccines and antibiotics. There are serious data gaps in many low-income settings, emphasising the need to expand microbiology laboratory capacity and data collection systems to improve our understanding of this important human health threat.

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