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Dr. Vanden Bossche is greatly concerned that the vaccinal antibodies can interfere with a child’s innate immunity.

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Question 4: Dr. Vanden Bossche has been greatly concerned that the vaccinal antibodies (the anti-spike antibodies that are produced after COVID vaccination) interfere with a child’s innate immunity. He says the vaccinal antibodies “out-compete” the child’s innate “natural antibodies” and more or less sideline the child’s innate immune system. He thinks the vaccinal antibodies interfere with the normal practice and normal development of the child’s innate immune system. Is this correct? What are “natural antibodies?”

Response:

There is a large body of scientific evidence regarding the importance and function of the innate immune system’s “natural antibodies” (or “innate antibodies”) [18-24] We have known about innate antibodies since the early 1960s. Since then, however, their importance has largely gone under-appreciated and inadequately emphasized. Fortunately, that is now changing.

Innate antibodies are nonspecific—meaning that they are capable of binding (with low affinity) to many different viruses. This enables them to play a key role, as “first responders,” to quickly neutralize viruses in general.

Through repeated interaction between innate antibodies and glycosylated viruses (like SC-2, many other respiratory viruses) the innate immune system gains education, practice, and experience in recognizing and appropriately attacking threatening viruses. Through continuous re-interaction between innate antibodies and viruses (and glycosylated agents in general), the innate immune system also becomes trained and practiced in recognizing what it should attack (non-self) and what it should leave alone (self). Without sufficient training and practice in distinguishing between “self” and “non-self,” the innate immune system is prone to autoimmune reactions (inappropriate immune attack on parts of one’s own body).

The above interaction between innate antibodies and viruses eventuates in the ongoing functional reprogramming (including frequent updates) of cell-mediated innate immunity (via epigenetic changes).

Early childhood is the time when the innate immune system receives the most important and greatest amount of the education, practice and experience mentioned above. Accordingly, it is particularly important to protect the normal interaction between innate antibodies and viruses during this critical time of optimal, foundational education of a young child’s innate immune system. It is also important to protect the normal interaction between innate antibodies and viruses during the continuing education of the innate immune system that occurs throughout adulthood.

There is scientific evidence that COVID vaccinal antibodies out-compete innate antibodies for binding sites on the virus and, thereby, interfere with normal interaction between innate antibodies and viruses. (Vaccinal antibodies bind strongly to viruses, whereas innate antibodies, by design, bind less tightly to viruses.) The result is interference with the normal on-going education, practice, and overall function of the innate immune system. This interference is particularly regrettable and consequential if it occurs during the most optimal time for education and practice of the innate immune system—namely, during early childhood.

This harmful vaccinal interference with the binding of innate antibodies to SC-2 lasts for as long as the titers of spike-specific vaccinal antibodies are elevated, which inevitably occurs when vaccinated (primed) individuals are continuously (or frequently and repeatedly) exposed to highly infectious SC-2 variants (e.g., Omicron variants) or receive “booster doses” of COVID vaccine.

When vaccinal antibodies (from COVID vaccination) impair a person’s innate immune system, this renders the person less able to handle viruses in general (not just SC-2) and predisposes the person to autoimmune disease. This adverse effect of COVID vaccinal antibodies on the development and practice of a person’s innate immune system is particularly detrimental if the COVID vaccine is given to young children. This adverse effect of COVID vaccination of young children is irreversible.

To better appreciate what is meant by “irreversible,” consider the following helpful (though imperfect) analogy: Think of a person’s learning of a second language. It is easiest to learn a second language if that language is taught and practiced during early childhood, when the developing brain is very nimble and easily “imprintable.” It is much harder to learn a second language later in life. So, there is a critically important and limited time (early childhood) during which learning a second language is easiest and most successful. That critical “imprinting” period occurs only once during a person’s life (during early childhood). If that greatest opportunity to learn a second language is missed (or disrupted), it is irretrievably lost. That does not mean that that person cannot learn a second language later in life, but without a solid, foundational second language education during early childhood, it is much more difficult to become fluent in a second language later in life.

Similarly, the greatest opportunity for a person’s innate immune system to receive an excellent, “imprinting” education is during early childhood. That critical period occurs only once during a person’s life (during early childhood). If that greatest opportunity to optimally “imprint” one’s innate immune system is missed (or disrupted), it is irretrievably lost. The innate immune system can still learn during later childhood and adulthood, but the learning will be more difficult and less successful. The COVID vaccines interfere with the foundational education of the innate immune system (during early childhood) and also interfere with continuing education throughout adulthood.

For the above reasons, we should particularly avoid COVID vaccination in young children!!

[Note to Physicians: Why and how would vaccinal interference with interaction between innate antibodies and a specific virus (like SC-2) affect the overall education of the innate immune system, regarding how to respond to other viruses and how to distinguish between non-self and self? This is complex but has to do with shared molecular patterns that many viruses have in common and that are also similar to molecular patterns (“self” patterns) on components of the human body. Innate antibodies enable upregulation of virus-derived “self-mimicking” peptides on infected cells at an early stage of infection. These patterns have a high level of amino acid homology across glycosylated viruses that cause acute self-limited infection or disease. Once the innate effector cell (NK cell) has been educated to “broadly” recognize such patterns, it can then upon subsequent encounters “fine tune” its recognition to better spot and target the virus it actually has to deal with. That is what is called “training” (which occurs via epigenetic changes enabling functional reprogramming of educated NK cells.]

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